Pediatrician - Wall
3350 Highway 138 Building 2 Suite 126
Wall, NJ 07719
732-280-6455

View the KidsDoc Symptom Checker from HealthyChildren.org

By contactus@steppingstonepediatrics.com
October 05, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Still unsure if your child should get the flu shot? We've compiled a few articles and sources for our readers to convince you, yes, you and your children should get the flu shot! Call us today at (732) 280-6455 to schedule!

TIME Magazine

http://time.com/5415276/flu-shot-2018/

CDC

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season-2018-2019.htm

American Academy of Pediatrics

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/AAP-Issues-Flu-Vaccine-Recommendations-for-2018-2019.aspx

NY Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/06/well/live/kids-get-your-flu-shot.html

By contactus@steppingstonepediatrics.com
August 31, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

From the American Academy of Pediatrics. - HealthyChildren.org

Question

How long should my child ride rear-facing?

Benjamin Hoffman, MD, FAAP

Answer

Rear facing is not just for babies! The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has long recommended that―infants ride in rear-facing car seats, and in 2018 the AAP updated that recommendation to encourage rear facing for as long as possible, until a child reaches the highest weight or height allowed by the manufacturer. Most convertible car safety seats have limits that will permit children to ride rear-facing past the second birthday.

Why the Change?

This recommendation was based not only on motor vehicle crashes in which children died or were injured, but also from what we know about the anatomy of young children. Young children have large heads compared to their body size, and a high center of gravity. The vertebrae in their spine are more shallow, and their ligaments are looser. All of these factors increase the risk of a spine injury in a crash. In a sudden, violent stop, a rear-facing seat will cradle a child's entire back and spread out the force of the crash, reducing the risk of serious injuries to the neck and spine.

More Evidence:

Children in other countries routinely ride rear-facing until age 4. Deaths and serious injuries to these children are extremely rare. While differences in car seats, vehicles, and driving conditions make it tricky to compare, data from those countries suggest that children in the U.S. are also best protected by riding rear-facing for as long as they can.

The Good News:

Over the years, car seat manufacturers have increased the weight and height limits on their rear-facing seats. This means that more children can ride rear-facing as they grow well into the toddler and preschool years.

No matter which direction your child faces in the car, though, it is important to read and follow the instructions from your car seat manufacturer. A certified child passenger safety technician can help you figure out what is best for your child and your vehicle. Find one online from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration or Safe Kids Worldwide.

By contactus@steppingstonepediatrics.com
June 13, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

From NJ Poison Control:

(Newark, NJ) – Warning. Allergy sufferers must err on the side of caution when driving under the influence of allergy medicines. Many legal (prescription and over-the-counter/OTC) drugs including oral antihistamines make driving unsafe due to side effects like sleepiness, loss of focus/attention, blurred vision and decreased coordination.

 

Case: A 17-year-old male suffering from seasonal allergies decided to take a non-prescription antihistamine prior to leaving for tennis practice. Approximately thirty minutes afterwards, he began feeling drowsy and dizzy. His parents noticed his altered state and prevented him from driving. His father called the NJ Poison Control Center to find out how long the side effects would last.

 

NJ Poison Control experts remind consumers that all medicines have side effects associated with them even when they are taken according to the directions. Experts suggest using caution when taking allergy medicines or giving them to children. Many may assume non-prescription (OTC) medicines do not carry risks because they are sold without a prescription. NJ Poison Control experts disagree:  they answer daily calls for help involving OTC products (side effects, drug interactions, overdose, etc.). Many non-prescription medicines can produce serious side effects which may cause harm to those taking them.

 

Before you reach for allergy medicine, either OTC or prescription, we recommend the following tips to prevent problems related to medication use:

 

  • Select medications that treat ONLY the symptoms you have.  For example, use a decongestant if you are congested, but only use decongestants with cough suppressant if you have a cough as well. 
  • Be mindful that many medicines contain more than one ingredient, and some may even contain alcohol.  Many ingredients used in medicine can interact dangerously with alcohol causing side effects like nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, fainting, and/or loss of coordination.  Keep in mind that these interactions can still occur even if they were not ingested at the same time. 
  • Watch for duplicate active ingredients in products taken at the same time.  Many medications contain the same active ingredients, even if they have different names and/or intended purposes.  Taking these together, even if each is in the intended dose, can result in serious overdose.
  • More does not mean better.  Don’t take medicines longer or in higher doses than the label recommends.  If symptoms persist, it is time to see a doctor. 
  • Be very careful about dosage recommendations especially with children.  With liquid medications, it is best to use a measuring spoon or dosing cup. Do not use a kitchen spoon.
  • Avoid adverse drug interactions.  If you are currently taking any prescription or non-prescription medications, ask your pharmacist or health care provider for assistance in choosing non-prescription medications. If unavailable, contact the health professionals at the NJ Poison Control Center anytime day or night for fast, free, medical advice 1-800-222-1222 www.njpies.org
By contactus@steppingstonepediatrics.com
March 20, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Poison Prevention from the AAP

Each year, approximately 3 million people— many under age 5— swallow or have contact with a poisonous substance. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers tips to prevent and to treat exposures to poison. 

To Prevent Poisoning in Your Home:

Most poisonings occur when parents or caregivers are home but not paying attention. The most dangerous potential poisons are medicines, cleaning products, liquid nicotine, antifreeze, windshield wiper fluid, pesticides, furniture polish, gasoline, kerosene and lamp oil. Be especially vigilant when there is a change in routine. Holidays, visits to and from grandparents’ homes, and other special events may bring greater risk of poisoning if the usual safeguards are defeated or not in place.

  • Store medicine, cleaning and laundry products, (including detergent packets) paints/varnishes and pesticides in their original packaging in locked cabinets or containers, out of sight and reach of children. It is best to use traditional liquid or powder laundry detergents instead of detergent packets until all children who live in or visit your home are at least 6 years old. 

  • Safety latches that automatically lock when you close a cabinet door can help to keep children away from dangerous products, but there is always a chance the device will malfunction or the child will defeat it. The safest place to store poisonous products is somewhere a child can't see or reach or see.

  • Purchase and keep all medicines in containers with safety caps. Discard unused medication. Note that safety caps are designed to be child resistant but are not fully child proof.

  • Never refer to medicine as “candy” or another appealing name.

  • Check the label each time you give a child medicine to ensure proper dosage. For liquid medicines, use the dosing device that came with the medicine. Never use a kitchen spoon. Watch the video, The Healthy Children Show: Giving Liquid Medicine Safely, for more information

  • If you use an e-cigarette, keep the liquid nicotine refills locked up out of children's reach and only buy refills that use child-resistant packaging. A small amount of liquid nicotine spilled on the skin or swallowed can be fatal to a child. See Liquid Nicotine Used in E-Cigarettes Can Kill Children

  • Never place poisonous products in food or drink containers.

  • Keep natural gas-powered appliances, furnaces, and coal, wood or kerosene stoves in safe working order.

  • Maintain working smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

  • Secure remote controls, key fobs, greeting cards, and musical children’s books. These and other devices may contain small button-cell batteries that can cause injury if ingested.

  • Know the names of all plants in your home and yard. If you have young children or pets, consider removing those that are poisonous

Poison Treatment Tips:

If your child is unconscious, not breathing, or having convulsions or seizures due to poison contact or ingestion, call 911 or your local emergency number immediately. If your child has come in contact with poison and has mild or no symptoms, call Poison Help at 1-800-222-1222

Different types and methods of poisoning require different, immediate treatment.

  • Swallowed poison. Take the item away from the child, and have the child spit out any remaining substance. Do not make your child vomit. Do not use syrup of ipecac.

  • Swallowed battery. If your child has swallowed a button-cell battery or a battery is lodged in his or her nose, ear, or throat, seek treatment in a hospital emergency department immediately. Serious tissue damage can occur in as little as 2 hours.

  • Skin poison. Remove the child’s clothes and rinse the skin with lukewarm water for at least 15 minutes.

  • Eye poison. Flush the child’s eye by holding the eyelid open and pouring a steady stream of room temperature water into the inner corner for 15 minutes.

  • Poisonous fumes. Take the child outside or into fresh air immediately. If the child has stopped breathing, start cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and do not stop until the child breathes on his or her own, or until someone can take over.





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.

Please contact us with any questions or concerns!

Choosing a pediatrician is an important and personal decision and we want you to feel at ease with the care you and your child will receive.

An online resource center providing you with additional helpful information.

Archive:

Tags

Categories:

Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest about our services.

Call 732-280-6455

3350 Highway 138 Building 2 Suite 126,
Wall, NJ 07719